Theme
4:30pm July 29, 2014
Anonymous asked: I know everybody has different opinions, but on average, would you say most basques support independence? Or not,?

Facts:
- Nowadays, almost 2/3 of the Basque MPs belong to nationalistic parties.
- This same year, Gure Esku Dago gathered thousands of people to connect Durango and Iruñea (123km / 76.4 miles apart) willing to have a right to decide whether Euskadi should be independent or not.
- If a referendum was held, “Yes” to independence would triumph in Bizkaia & Gipuzkoa, according to THIS (and that comes from a conservative Spanish newspaper, so… take it all with a pinch of salt).

Opinion:
- As you say, everybody has their opinion, but we consider there’s a general feeling that Spain is weighing Euskadi down - the two economies have two completely different paces, and that’s also a fact - and that Madrid is extremely selfish.
Just an example, we should have control over our ports and airports, but, as they’re ones of the most profitable of Spain, Madrid won’t give them to us, even though the agreement was signed in 1979 and Euskadi is claiming them ever since.
So, yes, we think many people want Euskadi (and Euskal Herria, but that’s even harder) to be independent, but, above all, a very high percentage of people want to have the chance to decide.

8:58am July 29, 2014
Let’s go with a legend, ok?
Saint Virila, who was born around 870 in Aragón, was the abbot of the Monastery of Leyre, in Nafarroa. He was said to be a very tranquil man who enjoyed nature. One day of spring, abbot Virila decided to take a walk in the woods near the monastery, while pondering the joy of eternity. 
Suddenly, a singing nightingale distracted him. When the bird flew away, Virila followed it to a crystal spring where he fell asleep. When the abbot awoke, he found his way back to the monastery after what he thought it was a long search.
When he distinguished the monastery, Virila was shocked to see that the size of the church and other parts was bigger than that same afternoon. When he entered, he couldn’t recognize or identify any of the monks who now occupied Leyre, as well as no monk there knew him.
So they decided to look his name up in the archive of the monastery and discovered that he was in fact abbot Virila, who disappeared in the woods 300 years before. 
And there are two different endings for this lovely story, so choose your favourite ^_~:
- In that very moment, the nightingale, sent by God, came to Leyre with a ring in its beak, placed it on Saint Virila’s finger and he became abbot again.- In that very moment, Virila understood the true meaning of divine eternity: that the little time a person spends listening to a singing bird, can be centuries for another. Soon after, surrounded by his new brothers, the abbot died of old age.
You can visit Saint Virila’s tomb in the Monastery of Leyre, of course.

Let’s go with a legend, ok?

Saint Virila, who was born around 870 in Aragón, was the abbot of the Monastery of Leyre, in Nafarroa. He was said to be a very tranquil man who enjoyed nature. One day of spring, abbot Virila decided to take a walk in the woods near the monastery, while pondering the joy of eternity.

Suddenly, a singing nightingale distracted him. When the bird flew away, Virila followed it to a crystal spring where he fell asleep. When the abbot awoke, he found his way back to the monastery after what he thought it was a long search.

When he distinguished the monastery, Virila was shocked to see that the size of the church and other parts was bigger than that same afternoon. When he entered, he couldn’t recognize or identify any of the monks who now occupied Leyre, as well as no monk there knew him.

So they decided to look his name up in the archive of the monastery and discovered that he was in fact abbot Virila, who disappeared in the woods 300 years before.

And there are two different endings for this lovely story, so choose your favourite ^_~:

- In that very moment, the nightingale, sent by God, came to Leyre with a ring in its beak, placed it on Saint Virila’s finger and he became abbot again.
- In that very moment, Virila understood the true meaning of divine eternity: that the little time a person spends listening to a singing bird, can be centuries for another. Soon after, surrounded by his new brothers, the abbot died of old age.

You can visit Saint Virila’s tomb in the Monastery of Leyre, of course.

3:19pm July 28, 2014
Anonymous asked: Hello girls! I have two questions. What are some popular dishes from Basque Country? And Is "tortilla española" from the Basque Country? Thank you :)

Kaixo!!

There are LOTS of popular dishes:
cod pil-pil style


Biscayan style cod


cod omelette


marmitako


squid in black ink


T-bone steak


lamb chops


black beans


porrusalda


intxaursaltsa


goxua


pantxineta


etc…

And about tortilla española… legend goes it comes from Nafarroa, but we can’t be 100% sure. Either way, the creator of Spanish omelette, whoever he/she was, is a GENIUS.